The Busy Homeowner Guy, Part 1

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Holy crap have I been busy.

Last we talked I recalled the tale of a vicious beating I took at the hands of a 12 foot sheet of drywall that fell off the lift I neglected to understand prior to use.  Since then I’ve gotten a lot accomplished and I’ll be posting my progress over the next several days as I recover from a pulled muscle in my lower back and get absolutely nothing of a physical nature accomplished.

Hanging the Drywall in my Office

During the remodel of my bedroom I learned a couple of things that I took into account when prepping for the office remodel:

  1. The more you glue the less you screw, and that makes finishing your drywall that much quicker.Use LIQUID NAILS or another construction adhesive on the back of your sheets and then stare in amazement as they hang with excellent stability with three or four screws per row instead of 5 or more.
  2. Plan for the least number of joints, especially butt joints. Think about your room dimensions ahead of time and order drywall lengths and widths that will minimize the number of joints you need to finish and, ideally, will eliminate butt joints completely.
  3. If your house is old or otherwise horribly studded, use 2×4 scabs and furring strips to square up your room and simplify hanging. My house is more than 150 years old and nothing is square so this step is pretty important for good results.

During the hanging and finishing in the office I learned a few more lessons, some the hard way:

  1. I’m not so sure about collared Phillips Bits anymore. Though it worked fine on my first room I ended up having to go over about 50% of the screws in my office and sink them just below the paper. I’m not sure if this was user error or the fault of the bit, so the verdict is still out.
  2. Get a Drywall Pole Sander. A combination of a pole sander with a fine grit paper and a foam sanding block made quick work of the sanding.
  3. Do a level 5 finish (skim coat). After I finished sanding I watered down my remaining compound to the consistency of pancake batter and applied it with a paint roller. After it dried I gave it a very light sanding. I can’t find a single imperfection in my walls or ceiling (here’s a video showing how). Three coats and a sanding are probablygood enough, but a skim coat definitely gives your drywall a professional feel.
2 replies
  1. Shane
    Shane says:

    Now that there’s some real neato home tips daddy-o! You make me wish i’d have kept more of a journal on tips when i did stuff cuz i’d go back to do it again much later and make my same old mistakes! I’m thinkin’ some day when i’m old i’ll do a video walkthru for all the future generations where i point out all the mistakes i made and how stuff should be corrected. They’ll LOVE that!

    • reichconsulting
      reichconsulting says:

      Fact of the matter is I write this blog more for myself than for anyone else and for exactly the reason you just mentioned! I forget stuff! I was originally going to do a Wikipedia-style site with DIY information, but I ended up with this. I figure these days I learn everything from the Internet that I was too damn lazy to learn from my dad, so I damn well better give back to the Internet when I have something to share 🙂

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